New York University School of Medicine

The New York University School of Medicine is the medical school of New York University. Founded in 1841 as the University Medical College, the NYU School of Medicine is one of the foremost medical schools in the United States, ranking 9th in research according to U.S. News & World Report. As of 2017, it is one of the most selective medical schools in the United States, with an acceptance rate of 1.6%. In 2014, New York University School of Medicine attracted over \$304.5 million in external research funding from the National Institutes of Health alone. The School of Medicine is part of NYU Langone Medical Center, named after Kenneth Langone, the investment banker and financial backer of The Home Depot. It is located at 550 First Avenue in New York City. The School of Medicine has 1,177 full-time faculty and 3,091 part-time faculty. Additionally, there are 104 endowed professorships, 1,078 residents/fellows, 68 M.D./Ph.D. candidates and 400 postdoctoral fellows as of 2011. The NYU Medical Center is home to the School of Medicine, the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, and the Charles C. Harris Skin & Cancer Pavilion. In 2016-17, NYU Langone Medical Center was also recognized on the U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospitals Honor Roll,” ranking 10th among the top hospitals in the nation with 13 nationally ranked specialties including cancer, cardiology & heart surgery, neurology & neurosurgery, orthopedics, diabetes & endocrinology, nephrology, geriatrics, gastroenterology, ear, nose & throat, rehabilitation, pulmonology, rheumatology, and urology. Graduates of New York University School of Medicine are accepted into competitive residency programs and leading medical centers. In August 2018, the School of Medicine announced it would be offering full-tuition scholarships to all current and future students in its MD degree program regardless of need or merit.

Medical education

New York University School of Medicine has recently implemented the curriculum for the 21st century. The new curriculum consists of 18 months of basic science and two and a half years of clinical training. Students take the USMLE Step 1 exam after the clerkship year (with the exception of MD/PhD students, who take it before starting their PhD work). This allows students additional time to take electives, conduct research, or go on away rotations. Other features of the curriculum include NYU3T (a joint program with the New York University College of Nursing) and PLACE (Patient-Based Longitudinal Ambulatory Care Experience). The NYU School of Medicine also offers several 5-year joint degree programs, some of which can be optionally completed in 4 years.: MD/MPA in Health Policy and Management (with the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service) MD/MPH in Global Health MD/MBA in General Management (with the New York University Stern School of Business) MD/MA in Bioethics MD/MSc in Clinical InvestigationSince 1964, NYU School of Medicine has offered MD/PhD dual degree training through the Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP). Recently, NYU School of Medicine has introduced a 3-year MD program based on the program first pioneered in Canada at McMaster University Medical School in 1965. The 3-year program can only be applied to by students accepted into the 4 year stream. 3-year program students are guaranteed a residency placement in their specialty of choice at NYU Langone Medical Center. They complete their preclinical training at the same time as 4 year students, however they start clinical rotations 6 weeks earlier and also spend the summer after their first year doing a summer fellowship in the department of their specialty of choice.

Admissions

Admission to NYU School of Medicine is among the most selective in the country. For the Class of 2019, NYU received 7,807 applications and interviewed 1027 applicants for a class of 132 medical students. The matriculating class had a median GPA of 3.87 and a MCAT score of 36, with 33% of the incoming class being underrepresented minorities.

Facilities

The main NYU Langone Medical Center campus is located at the East River waterfront at 1st Ave. between 30th and 34th street. It hosts the NYU School of Medicine, Tisch Hospital and the Howard A. Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine. Other NYU Langone Medical Center facilities across the city include the Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, the NYU Cancer Center on 34th Street, and Woodhull Hospital in Brooklyn. NYU Langone Medical Center also has a long-standing affiliation with the Bellevue Hospital, NYU's principal teaching hospital, of the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, and with the Manhattan Veteran's Affairs Hospital.Most recently, the NYU School of Medicine opened a new emergency simulation center at Bellevue Hospital in a joint effort with the City University of New York. Medical students, nurses, EMTs, and other medical staff will be able to practice and refine their skills on state-of-the-art mannequins, as well as actors playing standardized patients.Research facilities include the Sackler Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences and the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine.

History

New York University College of Medicine was established in 1841. The medical school merged with Bellevue Medical College in 1898 to form the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. The present name was adopted in 1960. The NYU School of Medicine is home to many key advancements in medical education. In 1854, human dissection in New York was legalized due to efforts of the faculty. In 1884, the Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the U.S. devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, was established at NYU. In 1932, the first department of forensic medicine in the U.S. was established at NYU. In 1941, NYU opened the first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the U.S. The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine were established in 1964. In 1980, NYU professor Saul Krugman, M.D., developed the first vaccine against hepatitis B. In 1866, NYU professors produced a report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health which led to establishment of New York City's Health Department. The same year, NYU opened the first outpatient clinic in the United States. In 1872, NYU Professor Steven Smith founded the American Public Health Association. In 1899, NYU graduate Walter Reed discovered the mosquito transmission of yellow fever. The 1993 construction of the Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine is the largest building project in history of NYU. During World War II, NYU College of Medicine was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.

Relationship with Mount Sinai School of Medicine

In 1998, the Mount Sinai-NYU Health System was established when the NYU Medical System merged with Mount Sinai Hospitals. The joint organization included Mount Sinai Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens, Tisch Hospital, Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, Hospital for Joint Diseases Orthopaedic Institute, NYU Downtown Hospital, and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. The merger made NYU the only private university in the country with two medical schools. The union dissolved in 2003 while confronting a shared debt of \$665.6 million, but NYU continued to award Mount Sinai's degrees. In 2010, however, the Mount Sinai School of Medicine was accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and became an independent degree-granting institution without a university affiliation for the first time in its history.

Evolution of the New York University School of Medicine

1841 - University Medical College organized as the Medical Department of the University of the City of New York 1861 - Bellevue Hospital Medical College Founded 1882 - New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital founded (incorporated in 1886) 1896 - Name of the University of the City of New York changed to New York University 1898 - University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College formed by merging of the University Medical College and Bellevue Hospital Medical College 1935 - Name changed to New York University College of Medicine 1945 - Post-graduate Division of New York University College of Medicine established 1948 - New York University Post-Graduate Medical school formed, representing a union of the Postgraduate Division of the College of Medicine and the New York Post-Graduate Medical School 1960 - Name of New York University-Bellevue Medical Center changed to New York University Medical Center - Name of New York University College of Medicine changed to New York University School of Medicine 2008 - New York University Medical Center Hospitals and School of Medicine renamed NYU Langone Medical Center

Timeline of notable events and discoveries

1841: The New York University College of Medicine opens, ten years after the founding of the university. Among the original faculty is John Revere, son of patriot Paul Revere, and Valentine Mott, probably the foremost surgeon of his day. 1854: Human dissection in New York is legalized due to efforts of faculty at the NYU College of Medicine. Also, the first successful resection of a hip joint is performed by Lewis A. Sayre, M.D., the first professor of orthopedic surgery in the United States. 1866: NYU professors of medicine produce a Report for the Council of Hygiene and Public Health. It leads to the establishment of New York City's Health Department. 1867: Established the first clinical professorship devoted to dermatology. Also, the first outpatient clinic in the United States opens at NYU. 1884: The Carnegie Laboratory, the first facility in the United States devoted to teaching and research in bacteriology and pathology, is established at NYU. 1897: Merged with the New York Skin and Cancer Hospital. 1899: Dr. Walter Reed discovers the mosquito transmission of yellow fever at NYU. 1911: The first outpatient cardiac clinic in New York is established by Hubert V. Guile, M.D. at NYU 1932: The first department of forensic medicine in the United States is established at NYU. Also, NYU organizes one of the nation's first interdisciplinary research efforts, the Rheumatic Diseases Study Group, helping to usher in the era of modern rheumatology. 1933: William S. Tillett, M.D. conducts groundbreaking studies of enzymes involved in blood clotting. His work leads to the development of streptokinase, used to combat heart attacks. 1941: The first department of physical medicine and rehabilitation in the United States is established at NYU. 1941-45: During the war years, NYU-trained Julius Axelrod, M.D., works with James Shannon, M.D., and other faculty members in the Medical Schools malaria program. Dr. Axelrod is later awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine. 1947: A site for a new Medical Center, consisting of the NYU School of Medicine, the Post-Graduate Medical School, University (now Tisch) Hospital, and the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, is selected. The Institute of Industrial Medicine is established. 1948: University Hospital is created through a merger of the New York Post-Graduate Hospital and New York Skin and Cancer Hospital. 1955: The Medical Science Building and the Henry W. and Albert Berg Institute opens at NYU. 1957: The Hall of Research and Alumni Hall are constructed. 1959: The Nobel Prize for Medicine is awarded to NYU faculty member Severo Ochoa, M.D., for his seminal study of biochemical genetics and nucleic acids. 1960: The Clinical Research Center, funded by the NIH, is established at NYU. 1960s: NYU pathologist Baruj Benacerraf, M.D., conducts pioneering research on genetic regulation of the immune system, for which he is later awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine in 1980. 1963: The new University Hospital opens. 1964: NYU establishes one of the first three Medical Scientist Training Programs (dual MD/PhD graduate programs funded by the NIH) in the United States. 1964: The Institute and Department of Environmental Medicine are established. 1975: One of the first designated national cancer centers is established at NYU, later named the Rita and Stanley H. Kaplan Center. 1981: NYU scientists present the first evidence linking rare cancer, Kaposi's sarcoma, with immune deficiency in a distinct population of homosexual men, a key step in identifying AIDS. 1992: NYU Medical Center opens Women's Health Services under the auspices of the Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Radiology. 1993: The School of Medicine's Skirball Institute of Biomolecular Medicine, the largest building project in history of NYU, is opened as an uncompromising commitment to the advancement and understanding of molecular approaches for the treatment of various important diseases. 1995: The Sir Harold Acton Society is established to recognize donors of \$1 million or more. 1998: NYU Medical Center is restructured, creating the “NYU Hospitals Center” (including Tisch Hospital and Rusk Institute), the “NYU Health System” (consisting of NYU Hospitals Center, Hospital for Joint Diseases and NYU Downtown Hospital), and the “NYU School of Medicine” which remains an administrative unit of New York University. 2004: The NYU Clinical Cancer Center is opened. 2006: The School of Medicine's Joan and Joel Smilow Research Center is opened and houses 9 dedicated programmatic areas: Cancer, Cardiovascular Biology, Dermatology/Cutaneous Biology, Genetics/Genomics/Proteomics, Medicine/Infectious Disease, Medicine/Renal Medicine, Microbial Pathogenesis, Integrated Neuroscience, and Stem Cell Biology. Also, NYU Medical Center won a grant of \$26.7 million, largest grant ever awarded by any school in NYU.

Institutional Pedigrees

Notable people

Notes

External links

NYU Medical Center / School of Medicine NYU School of Medicine / Library and Archives - Main Page NYU School of Medicine / Library and Archives - Alumni and Photograph Databases “New York University Medical Center collected news and commentary”. The New York Times.